Menu
The world of science and progress
Pulsar Transformed Into Small Planet Made of Diamond Discovered in Milky Way

New Depiction of Light Could Boost Telecommunications Channels

Free Radicals Crucial to Suppressing Appetite

Preserving 4 Percent of the Ocean Could Protect Most Marine Mammal Species, Study Finds

Panda Poop May Be a Treasure Trove of Microbes for Making Biofuels

Discovery Sheds Light On the Ecosystem of Young Galaxies

New Method Reveals Parts of Bacterial Genome Essential to Life

Novel Alloy Could Produce Hydrogen Fuel from Sunlight

Tiny Oxygen Generators Boost Effectiveness of Anticancer Treatment

Bedrock Nitrogen May Help Forests Buffer Climate Change, Study Finds

'Gene Overdose' Causes Extreme Thinness

Manufacturing Method Paves Way for Commercially Viable Quantum Dot-Based LEDs

Cutting Soot Emissions: Fastest, Most Economical Way to Slow Global Warming?

Tasmanian Tiger's Jaw Was Too Small to Attack Sheep, Study Shows

Manipulating Plants' Circadian Clock May Make All-Season Crops Possible

NASA's Chandra Finds Nearest Pair of Supermassive Black Holes

Up from the Depths: How Bacteria Capture Carbon in the 'Twilight Zone'

Understanding Next-Generation Electronic Devices: Smallest Atomic Displacements Ever

Woolly Rhino Fossil Discovery in Tibet Provides Important Clues to Evolution of Ice Age Giants

Sparing or Sharing? Protecting Wild Species May Require Growing More Food On Less Land

Glowing, Blinking Bacteria Reveal How Cells Synchronize Biological Clocks

Rock Rafts Could Be 'Cradle of Life'

Robots Learn to Handle Objects, Understand New Places

World's Smallest Electric Motor Made from a Single Molecule

First Stem Cells from Endangered Species

Sparing or Sharing? Protecting Wild Species May Require Growing More Food On Less Land
The study, by researchers at the University of Cambridge and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, collected information on more than 600 species in southwest Ghana and northern India, two parts of the world where demand for agricultural land is putting ever more pressure on wild species. The researchers measured crop production as well as the abundances of birds and trees in forests and in various types of farmland.

"Farmland with some retained natural vegetation had more species of birds and trees than high-yielding monocultures of oil palm, rice or wheat but produced far less food energy and profit per hectare," said lead author Dr Ben Phalan from the University of Cambridge. "As well as requiring more land to produce the same amount of food, the 'wildlife-friendly' farmlands were not as wildlife-friendly as they first appeared. Compared with forest, they failed to provide good habitat for the majority of bird and tree species in either region."

The researchers discovered that, under current and future scenarios of food demand, most species would have larger total populations if farming was restricted to the smallest area feasible, while protecting as much natural forest as possible. This was true not just for rare species but for common species as well.

This strategy, called 'land sparing', uses higher yields on existing farmland to spare land for nature (in contrast with 'land sharing', which aims to conserve wild species and grow crops on the same land). Because high-yield farming produced more food from less land, it could be used as part of a strategy to protect larger tracts of natural habitats such as forest.

"It would be nice to think that we could conserve species and produce lots of food, all on the same land," said study author, Dr Malvika Onial from the University of Cambridge. "But our data from Ghana and India show that's not the best option for most species. To produce a given amount of food, it would be better for biodiversity to farm as productively as possible, if that allows more natural habitat to be protected or restored."

"It is critical to note that increasing crop yields would not work in isolation," said study author Professor Andrew Balmford from the University of Cambridge. "Such increases need to be combined with active measures such as national parks and community reserves to protect natural habitats from conversion to farmland. Conservation policy-makers should explore new ways to link protection of natural habitats with efforts to increase food yield per unit area in sustainable ways. Food retailers could perhaps make these linkages a feature of environmentally-friendly food products."

The researchers cautioned, however, that although their findings in Ghana and India are remarkably consistent, they may not hold true everywhere. It is possible that land sparing will be a better strategy in some places and land sharing in others. They advise that further studies in representative parts of the world are needed to determine whether there is a more general pattern.

"Our study does not give uncritical support to large-scale agribusiness over small-scale farming systems," said study author Professor Rhys Green from the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds and the University of Cambridge. "High-yielding organic farming and other systems such as agroforestry can be a useful component of a land sparing strategy and may offer the additional advantage of fewer adverse effects of farming from fertilisers and pesticides. But whatever the farming system, protection of natural habitats will continue to be essential for the conservation of many species."


serial data analyzer
como recuperar un archivo borrado mac https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aO80xb-i8I8
port COM virtuel
cannot access serial port
accounting staffing agencies houston galleria

Menu
Growing Meat in the Lab: Scientists Initiate Action Plan to Advance Cultured Meat

Recycling Fat Might Help Worms Live Longer

In More Socially Engaging Environment, White Fat Turns to Brown, Mouse Study Suggests

Clouds Don't Cause Climate Change, Study Shows

Novel Magnetic, Superconducting Material Opens New Possibilities in Electronics

New Material Shows Promise for Trapping Pollutants

Breakthrough Could Double Wireless Capacity With No New Towers

Microbes Generate Electricity While Cleaning Up Nuclear Waste

Milky Way Galaxy Might Hold Thousands of Ticking 'Time Bombs'

Neurosurgeons Use Adult Stem Cells to Grow Neck Vertebrae

Jumping Gene's Preferred Targets May Influence Genome Evolution

Peer Pressure? It's Hardwired Into Our Brains, Study Finds

Scientists Create Mammalian Cells With Single Chromosome Set

Evidence for a Persistently Iron-Rich Ocean Changes Views On Earth's Early History

Nanosensors Made from DNA May Light Path to New Cancer Tests and Drugs

Endangered Horse Has Ancient Origins and High Genetic Diversity, New Study Finds

Australopithecus Sediba Paved the Way for Homo Species, New Studies Suggest

Babies Distinguish Pain from Touch at 35-37 Weeks, Research Finds

Mantis Shrimp: Ocean Floor Critters Communicate in Synchronized Rumbles

Powered by Seaweed: Polymer from Algae May Improve Battery Performance

Captivated by Critters: Humans Are Wired to Respond to Animals

Birth Control Pills Affect Memory, Researchers Find

NASA Launches Mission to Study Moon From Crust to Core

Sea Levels Much Less Stable Than Earlier Believed, New Coral Dating Method Suggests

Ferroelectrics Could Pave Way for Ultra-Low Power Computing