Menu
The world of science and progress
Pulsar Transformed Into Small Planet Made of Diamond Discovered in Milky Way

New Depiction of Light Could Boost Telecommunications Channels

Free Radicals Crucial to Suppressing Appetite

Preserving 4 Percent of the Ocean Could Protect Most Marine Mammal Species, Study Finds

Panda Poop May Be a Treasure Trove of Microbes for Making Biofuels

Discovery Sheds Light On the Ecosystem of Young Galaxies

New Method Reveals Parts of Bacterial Genome Essential to Life

Novel Alloy Could Produce Hydrogen Fuel from Sunlight

Tiny Oxygen Generators Boost Effectiveness of Anticancer Treatment

Bedrock Nitrogen May Help Forests Buffer Climate Change, Study Finds

'Gene Overdose' Causes Extreme Thinness

Manufacturing Method Paves Way for Commercially Viable Quantum Dot-Based LEDs

Cutting Soot Emissions: Fastest, Most Economical Way to Slow Global Warming?

Tasmanian Tiger's Jaw Was Too Small to Attack Sheep, Study Shows

Manipulating Plants' Circadian Clock May Make All-Season Crops Possible

NASA's Chandra Finds Nearest Pair of Supermassive Black Holes

Up from the Depths: How Bacteria Capture Carbon in the 'Twilight Zone'

Understanding Next-Generation Electronic Devices: Smallest Atomic Displacements Ever

Woolly Rhino Fossil Discovery in Tibet Provides Important Clues to Evolution of Ice Age Giants

Sparing or Sharing? Protecting Wild Species May Require Growing More Food On Less Land

Glowing, Blinking Bacteria Reveal How Cells Synchronize Biological Clocks

Rock Rafts Could Be 'Cradle of Life'

Robots Learn to Handle Objects, Understand New Places

World's Smallest Electric Motor Made from a Single Molecule

First Stem Cells from Endangered Species

Neurosurgeons Use Adult Stem Cells to Grow Neck Vertebrae
Neurosurgery researchers at UC Davis Health System have used a new, leading-edge stem cell therapy to promote the growth of bone tissue following the removal of cervical discs -- the cushions between the bones in the neck -- to relieve chronic, debilitating pain.

The procedure was performed by associate professors of neurosurgery Kee Kim and Rudolph Schrot. It used bone marrow-derived adult stem cells to promote the growth of the bone tissue essential for spinal fusion following surgery, as part of a nationwide, multicenter clinical trial of the therapy.

Removal of the cervical disc relieves pain by eliminating friction between the vertebrae and/or nerve compression. Spinal fusion is used following surgery for degenerative disc disease, where the cushioning cartilage has worn away, leaving bone to rub against bone and herniated discs, where the discs pinch or compress nerves.

"We hope that this investigational procedure eventually will help those who undergo spinal fusion in the back as well as in the neck," said Kim, who also is chief of spinal neurosurgery at UC Davis. "And the knowledge gained about stem cells also will be applied in the near future to treat without surgery those suffering from back pain."

Millions of Americans are affected by spine diseases, with approximately 40 percent of all spinal fusion surgery performed for cervical spinal fusion. Some 230,000 patients are candidates for spinal fusion, with the numbers of potential patients increasing by 2 to 3 percent each year as the nation's population ages.

"This is an exciting clinical trial to test the ability of the bone-forming stem cells from healthy donors to help patients with spinal disease," said Jan Nolta, director of the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures.

"For the past 50 years, bone marrow-derived stem cells have been used to rebuild patients' blood-forming systems. We know that subsets of stem cells from the marrow also can robustly build bone. Their use now to promote vertebral fusion is a new and extremely promising area of clinical study," she said.

The stem cell procedure at UC Davis took place early in August. The patient was a 53-year-old male from the Sacramento region with degenerative disc disease.

In the surgery, called an anterior cervical discectomy, a cervical disc or multiple discs are removed via an incision in the front of the neck. The investigational stem cell therapy then is applied to promote fusion of the vertebrae across the space created by the disc removal.

The stem cells are derived from a healthy single adult donor's bone marrow, and thus are very homogenous, Kim said. They are grown in culture to high concentration with minimal chance for rejection by the recipient, he said.

Adequate spinal fusion fails to occur in 8 to 35 percent or more of patients, and persistent pain occurs in up to 60 percent of patients with fusion failure, which often necessitates additional surgery.

"A lack of effective new bone growth after spine fusion surgery can be a significant problem, especially in surgeries involving multiple spinal segments," said Schrot, co-principal investigator for the study. "This new technology may help patients grow new bone, and it avoids harvesting a bone graft from the patient's own hip or using bone from a deceased donor."

Current methods of promoting spinal fusion include implanting bone tissue from the patient's hip or a cadaver to encourage bone regrowth as well as implanting bone growth-inducing proteins. However, the Food and Drug Administration has not approved the use of bone morphogenetic proteins for cervical spinal fusion. Their use has been associated with life-threatening complications, particularly in the neck.

The leading-edge stem cell procedure is part of a prospective, randomized, single-blinded controlled study to evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of an investigational therapy: modified bone marrow-derived stem cells combined with the use of a delivery device as an alternative to promote and maintain spinal fusion.

The study includes 10 investigational centers nationwide. The UC Davis Department of Neurological Surgery anticipates enrolling up to 10 study participants who will be treated with the stem cell therapy and followed for 36 months after their surgeries. A total of 24 participants will be enrolled nationwide.

The study is one of several clinical trials under way in the UC Davis Spine Center and led by Kim. He anticipates launching a clinical trial soon to study the safety of injecting stem cells into disc tissue to repair degenerated discs.

The current study is sponsored by Mesoblast, Ltd., of Melbourne, Australia, which is developing adult universal-donor stem cell products built upon the discovery of adult-derived mesenchymal precursor cells. Kim and Schrot will not be compensated for their participation in the study.

Для печати
possibly here

sftp client for mac
aws mount s3 as drive
usb capture
Techmileage
Patienttransit.com

Menu
Growing Meat in the Lab: Scientists Initiate Action Plan to Advance Cultured Meat

Recycling Fat Might Help Worms Live Longer

In More Socially Engaging Environment, White Fat Turns to Brown, Mouse Study Suggests

Clouds Don't Cause Climate Change, Study Shows

Novel Magnetic, Superconducting Material Opens New Possibilities in Electronics

New Material Shows Promise for Trapping Pollutants

Breakthrough Could Double Wireless Capacity With No New Towers

Microbes Generate Electricity While Cleaning Up Nuclear Waste

Milky Way Galaxy Might Hold Thousands of Ticking 'Time Bombs'

Neurosurgeons Use Adult Stem Cells to Grow Neck Vertebrae

Jumping Gene's Preferred Targets May Influence Genome Evolution

Peer Pressure? It's Hardwired Into Our Brains, Study Finds

Scientists Create Mammalian Cells With Single Chromosome Set

Evidence for a Persistently Iron-Rich Ocean Changes Views On Earth's Early History

Nanosensors Made from DNA May Light Path to New Cancer Tests and Drugs

Endangered Horse Has Ancient Origins and High Genetic Diversity, New Study Finds

Australopithecus Sediba Paved the Way for Homo Species, New Studies Suggest

Babies Distinguish Pain from Touch at 35-37 Weeks, Research Finds

Mantis Shrimp: Ocean Floor Critters Communicate in Synchronized Rumbles

Powered by Seaweed: Polymer from Algae May Improve Battery Performance

Captivated by Critters: Humans Are Wired to Respond to Animals

Birth Control Pills Affect Memory, Researchers Find

NASA Launches Mission to Study Moon From Crust to Core

Sea Levels Much Less Stable Than Earlier Believed, New Coral Dating Method Suggests

Ferroelectrics Could Pave Way for Ultra-Low Power Computing